Tuesday, February 06, 2007

Gnostic Blogtopia
At last, the second K-Punk post on The Fall arrives. For me, the most interesting upshot of this is that it actually illuminates what Current 93's Black Ships Ate the Sky is all about. David Tibet (or whatever we're supposed to call him now) has said that one the album's themes is his belief that the Roman Empire never ended. Turns out that Philip K Dick felt the same way. According to K-Punk: "Dick's intuition was that 'the Empire had never ended', and that history was shaped by an ongoing occult(ed) conflict between Rome and Gnostic forces". How Tibet squares this with his avowed Catholicism is beyond me.

Anyway, it's another fantastic post, well worth the wait and a great excuse for me to sit, cat in lap, and scrutinize Grotesque anew (as I did last night). Seems there's going to be a third installment, too. I suspect that this part is going to concentrate largely on Hex Enduction Hour but I hope that K-Punk will have enough courage to defy the current critical consensus and give my beloved Leckie Trilogy the attention it deserves.

Elsewhere, in Blogtopia, Woebot show us stills of Juana Molina's sitcom. Ay ay ay, no es bueno!

6 comments:

charlie m. said...

I think he finally got tired of people mocking his name confusion and went back to david tibet (my favorite being the artist formerly known as tibet)

Biggie Samuels said...

I'm amazed to hear that Tibet is put off by ridicule. How does he get anything done?

Anonymous said...

"Dick's intuition was that 'the Empire had never ended', and that history was shaped by an ongoing occult(ed) conflict between Rome and Gnostic forces". How Tibet squares this with his avowed Catholicism is beyond me.

It's not much different from the occult conflict between Babylon & Ethiopia in rastafarian doctrine.
The empire as the engine of spiritual striving.

Tibet has been searching for a homeland for a long time.

Anonymous said...

uh, that was me.

- barbara

Biggie Samuels said...

Still can't remember that Blogger login, eh?

Actually a lot of the lyrics on "Black Ships..." are distinctly Rasta flavoured. I think there's even a song called "Babylon Destroyer".

Imagine Paul St Hilaire or - better still - Horace Andy doing a version of "Idumae"! Hey, if they got Will Oldham and Shirley Collins to do it...

Biggie Samuels said...

BTWFYI:The third part of K-Punk's epic Fall post is now online. Predictably it concentrates on Hex and stops before the Leckie years but this is understandable as, while the Leckie albums represent the fullest realization of the band's vision, they contain rather less reading material, with Mark E. Smith's voice reduced, for the most part, to an instrumental texture - a partial return to group democracy, perhaps due to the incredible band Smith had assembled at that point.